In the News

Life happened the past few weeks, but I’m looking forward to getting back into the swing of things here on Cultural Heritage and Information. Today I thought I’d post some interesting stories from around the web that relate to topics here on the blog.

HathiTrust Digital Library Wins Latest Round in Battle With Authors

With new publishing technologies and research practices, the copyright debates will continue to evolve in legal and other settings. The Chronicle of Higher Education posted a summary (by Jennifer Howard) on June 10th about the latest developments in the HathiTrust Digital Library vs. Authors Guild case. Ultimately, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (in New York) decided for the library. Its decision will allow a searchable, full-text database of the Library’s works under the “fair use” clause, and will also allow dissemination of works in different formats for vision-impaired users.

What happens When Preservation and Innovation Collide?

The National Trust for Historic Preservation reflects on two years of innovation strategy development with EmcArts’ Innovation Lab for Museums. In the post (by Estevan Rael-Galvez), they share their ideas, challenges, and successes. Most interesting, in my opinion, is their idea to transition traditional historic house museums (which I adore), from static contrived experiences to more integrated, immersive experiences that stimulate all the senses of visitors.

Bit Rot: The Limits of Conservation

Hyperallergic.com discussed (in a post by Martha Buskirk on June 9) how time affects access and preservation of electronic media. The article supports “lots of copies keep stuff safe” as a general strategy to work toward in preservation and conservation of cultural and art artifacts. It also describes common obstacles, such as getting artists’ input on migration to new technologies, obsolescence of older technologies, copyright issues, determining in what aspects of the works the value lies, and the consequences of benign neglect. Best practice? Awareness and vigilance about what we want to save, and what has value to us.

How difficult can your manuscripts be?

The National Conservation Service in the UK blogged about some challenges that crop up when digitizing manuscripts. Some issues they faced during the digitization process for Khojki manuscripts from the Institute of Ismaili Studies include illegible text located in awkward places (e.g., the gutters), curved and warped pages, and ink degradation.

World Cups

Just for fun, I’m sharing the Horniman Museum and Gardens‘ World Cup tie-in, about a digital exhibit they created on cups from around the world (“world cups”… get it?). Cups from locations such as Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, and Colombia feature in the exhibit.